January 14, 2009

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                          THE
     WEST ENDER
 
                      In Memory
 
In Memory of Dan Souther, 68 who passed away December 30, 2008 due to complications from brain surgery.
He graduated from Sylvan in 1958.
He had a daughter Suzanne and a son Danny, 2 grandchildren, and 2 brothers Charles & Eddie.
 
                       *******************
 
 
 WANTED TO LET YOU KNOW THAT  MY SISTER, MILDRED COLLEEN MOORE IVEY, PASSED AWAY ON FRIDAY DECEMBER 05, 2008.  SHE WAS SURVIVED BY FIVE CHILDREN, TWELVE GRANDCHILDREN  AND SIX GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN AS WELL AS TWO SISTERS AND NIECES AND NEPHEWS.   COLLEEN GRADUATED FROM BROWN IN THE FIRST GRADUATING CLASS AFTER BROWN BECAME A HIGH SCHOOL, JANUARY 23RD, 1948.   SHE HAD ALSO ATTENDED JOE BROWN JR HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE GOING TO GIRLS HIGH.    
 
    THANKS FOR REMEMBERING HER.   LEAH MOORE
 
 
                                =====
 
 
 
Mrs. Townsends 5th grade I.N.Ragsdale class---      1955
 
      
               
 
A Happy New Year to all !!!    From Elaine Aycock Class of 1967 Southwest High. Love the newsletter! Thanks to all for your commitment to remembering our wonderful past.
Cheers!
        
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I don't know who the people here are, but a reader sent this picture in and the details as follows:
    On December 12 a group consisting of an online Brown High community collected and presented a gift of $ 1,100 dollars tto a needy family with kids attending Brown Middle school, the family was selected by the school administrators and then the Brown High alumni went to work donatting to the gift fund.
       This photo shows the two Brown Middle school students and the school counsellor being presented the gift check along with two Brown alumni in the hallway of Brown.
 
.
 
 
Again I wish these people had been identified, but what a nice Christmas  gesture.
 
 
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Dear Friends at the Westender:

I don't know how Tom and I ended up on your mailing list, but I want
to take this chance to tell you how very much we enjoy receiving the
Westender via e-mail.

Tom and I grew up in East Atlanta; we both attended Murphy High; in
1961 he graduated from Murphy and because of the building of East
Atlanta High, I wasn't in the district to continue at Murphy and
subsequently left and graduated from East Atlanta High in 1961.

Reading all the memories of living in your small area of southwest
Atlanta brings back so many memories that Tom and I share of growing
up in East Atlanta. World War II was over, our fathers had jobs,
most moms stayed at home and took care of every-day chores, and we
were free to roam on our bikes until the street lights came on. Such
sweet memories of the "good ole days".

Please continue to send the Westender and thank you again for
allowing us to share in all your wonderful memories.

Sincerely, Lynn Daniel Giglio
 
         ======
 
To All West Enders,
Happy New Years from the "Old Sylvan Boys" Charles and Bob Hamby, James Akins and Mack Cobb. We miss all of you and hope to hear from you next year.
The Old Sylvan Boys

                   *********
Do You Remember Willlie B ??
 
Did you ever see Willie B. when he was a baby  gorilla?
One winter during the early 1960s, I was home on Marine
leave and I could not get anyone to go out to the zoo with me. It was
bitter cold that day and the wind was really blowing. I made it up to the
monkey house and, once inside, I saw a few people down at one end of the almost deserted building. I went on down and there he was, the center of attention; yet
still just a little guy. It was obvious that he was tired and, as all
babies do, was trying to fight sleep. He had a little red, high-back
chair that was just his size. He drug the chair over until he was center
stage. He sat down with his legs spread and the back of the chair away
from him. He studied the few people who had come to see him. Because of
a glare on the glass dividing us from him, I can not say for sure that he
actually saw us; but he knew for certain that we were there. He was about
to give a performance like none other. He positioned his little hands
around the chair legs closes to him, stared at us and then raised the chair high
above this head. He paused as if playing it for effect, then with a
sudden, swift, downward thrust, slammed the chair against the grey cement
floor. The loud explosive sound shattered the quiet and echoed throughout
the building. Willie B. just sat there and grinned at us. A few
moments passed and then he re-gripped the same chair legs, slowing raising
the chair above his head as before. Was he playing with us or like any
tired kid, just trying to stay awake ? Again the chair slammed down, but
this time, with even more force. This time it was greeted with laughter
from the crowd, which had increased a few more. Willie B. surveyed
the crowd, his movements slowing now. He gripped the legs again and
slowly the chair rose to the top of his reach. He looked once more
toward us as the chair started slowly down. It landed, not with the
explosions as before, but with a barely heard tap. Willie B.'s head now
rested in the seat, his little eyes closed. He had lost the battle with
the Sandman, but had won forever a place in our hearts.
As we left the building, I glanced over my shoulder toward the center stage were the
little guy rested.
Somehow it did not feel as cold as when I had entered.
Bill Stewart (Sylvan '59)
 
 
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   This Months  Old Time  Radio Show
     You return to the old West with Hopalong Cassidy   click:    Coltsville Terror    Sttarring William Boyd
 
 
 
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Dian Heard Cole shares her wonderfuul reflections of growing up in West End.
For my family, West End goes way, way back. Actually, my mother's grandparent's got 200 acres in the land lottery in the mid 1800's. This land was behind Park St. Meth. Church. They later moved to Hapeville and in the early 1900's returned. My mother, Asilee Daniell Heard, went to Lee St. Elementary School and as she called it, Joe Brown, which was a Jr, High School when it first opened. This was in the '20's and '30's. Fast forward to my generation, and my brother, Jay Heard, and I, Dian Heard Cole, went to J C Harris Elementary School and then moved out to Cascade Heights and finished at Venetian Hills Elem and Southwest High(class of '60).

I want to mention a few things which I remember that I don't think I've read from anyone. When I was around 1st grade on up, I looked forward to the fall/winter Sears catalog coming so I could look at the dresses and wish and dream about which ones I wanted for going back to school. The dresses were almost all plaid with some type of white collar. Usually they were tight at the waist with a gathered skirt and a sash to tie in the back. My mother would make me wear any new dress I got first to church before I could wear it to school. I would get so frustrated in having to wait about wearing the new dress to school.

Also, can you remember getting your fall school supplies from the dime store...all packaged up in a big brown envelope? I can still remember a dime store somewhere in the block across from Clyatt's Drug Store. What about the cherry/cokes at the drug store?

We had an alley behind our house on Altoona. The garbage truck would come down the alley. Behind my grandmother's house on Wellingston St, the alley was full of pieces of crushed glass. I loved to look for the pretty colors of glass mixed in with the clear and brown glass. My grandmother had a small goldfish pond with a large cedar tree next to it. In the summer my brother and I would tie a string onto a June bug and let it fly around with us holding the string.

I took dancing lessons for years from Frances Coker. We would have our recitals at Brown High School's auditorium. We would also dance each spring at the Wren's Nest when they had their festival. I was short, so I was always on the end of the line. The mother's would usually make the dancing outfits and they were often quite elaborate.

I also took piano lessons from a lady who lived directly across from J C Harris Elem. School. The teacher's house was always dark and so quiet. I always wanted to play music I had heard of, but instead she kept me in those awful piano lesson books. Can anybody remember "The Happy Farmer?" That was the name of one of the songs.

My mother, brother, and I would get on the trolley and ride downtown to Rich's to shop. My brother's department was in the basement and I can remember him getting jeans there. We would eat in the Magnolia Room. The fabric department was on the fifth floor and we often looked there as my mother sewed some of my clothes. Rich's had the only "real" Santa in town. It was an annual trip and sometimes the line was very long. The toy department was on the 2nd floor, I think, and I always loved to look at the pretty dolls. One year I hid behind the counter and the store was closing and my parents couldn't find me. There was a preacher who yelled outside of Rich's on the corner. My husband, Steve Cole, Brown '60, and I have talked about this preacher. He remembers him too, and we both remember how frightened we were of walking near him. I wonder if anyone ever really listened to him.

My family went to Park St. Meth. Church until I was in the 8th grade. I can still remember Brother Manning(the minister) pounding on the podium and raising his voice. It would scare me. That is a beautiful old church. My parents got married there. Many of the members of their Sunday School class had gone there as young adults, married someone in the class, and continued to be friends for many, many years. Several of the Brown High football players of the '50's went there and some of them went on to GA Tech. and played football. I still have a GA Tech pennent signed by Johnny Hunsinger.
Enough of my ramblings...Thanks for the great chance to go back in time. Keep the newsletters coming. I'd love to hear from anyone who is from my era. [Email Address Removed]
Dian Heard Cole
      
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GEE WHAT A WONDERFUL WAY TO WISH SEASONS GREETINGS TO ALL FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES FROM THE PAST.
MY MEMORIES OF THE PAST OF LIVING IN THE WESTEND CASCADE HEIGHTS AREAS ARE TOO MANY TO LIST BUT, JUST HAVING THE OPPORTUNITY OF BEING ABLE TO BE RAISED AND EDUCATED BACK IN THOSE YEARS WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.
I WANT TO WISH ALL WHO SHARED THAT PART OF MY LIFE THERE AND ALL OTHER REBELS THE " HAPPIEST AND MOST BOUNTIFUL NEW YEAR"
John Thornton BHS 1955
 
 
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A New Years Message From Rev.Richard P.Williams another Southwwest / Cascade Heights friend.
I am going to reflect on some of the wonderful messages that were included in the Christmas newsletter.Especially all the many thoughts of growing up and loving Atlanta, it seemed as though I was living those experiences all over again.
    While growing up we were members of Cascade Baptist Church,we had so many friends there and all that was a part of the experience of growing up in such a wonderful area.
I think back to when we just did not like to see New Years day come around,for that meant uugggh! "back to school after the most glorious time of year had come and gone.Just as in many other families,New Years day meant watching the parades and football games just as today.
But today I always ask "did I leave things undone" during the past year? Can I smile and feel that I learned from last years experiences? Well I feel that most of us can say yes to that, Don't you?
Let me take this opportunity to wish everyone who reads this wonderful newsletter a Happy New Year
 
Richard P Williams
 
 
   *********
         THE GREEN GARDEN SNAKE
 
ALWAYS THOUGHT GREEN SNAKES WERE OK?.
..Green garden grass snakes can be dangerous.  Yes, grass snakes, not rattlesnakes.  A coupld in Sweetwater, Texas had a lot of potted plans, and during a recent cold spell, the wife was bringing a lot of them indoors to protect them from a possible freeze.  It turned out that a little green garden grass snake was hidden in one of the plants and when it had warmed up, it slithered out and the wife saw it go under the sofa.  She let out a very loud scream.
 
The husband who was taking a shower ran out into the living room naked to see what the problem was.  She told him there was a snake under the sofa. 
He got down on the floor on his hands and knees to look for it.  About that time the family dog came and cold-nosed him on the leg.  He tought the snake had bitten him and he fainted.  His wife thought he had a heart attack, so she called an ambulance.  The attendants rushed in and loaded him on the stretcher and started carrying him out.  About that time the snake came out from under the sofa and the Emergency Medical Technician saw it and dropped his end of the stretcher.  That's when the nam broke his leg and why he is in the hospital.
The wife still had the problem of the snake in the house, so she called on a neighbor man.  He volunteered to capture the snake.  He armed himself with a rooled-up newspaper and began poking under the couch.  Soon he decided it was gone and told the woman, who sat down on the sofa in relief.  But in relaxing, her hand dangled in between the cushions, where she felt the snake wriggling around.  She screamed and fainted, the snake rushed back under the sofa, and the neighbor man, seeing her laying there passed, tried to use CPR to revive her.  The neighnor's wife, who had just returned from shopping at the grocery store, saw her husband's mouth on the woman's mouth and slammed her husband in the back of the head with a bag of canned goods, knocking him out and cutting his scalp to a point where it needed stitches.  An ambulance was again called and it was determined that the injury required hospitalization.
The noise woke the woman from her dead faint and she saw her neighbor lying on the floor with his wife bending over him, so she assumed he had been bitten by the snake.  She went to the kitchen, brought back a small bottle of whiskey, and began pouring it down the man's throat.
By now the police had arrived.  They waw the unconscious man, smelled th4e whiskey, and assumed that a drunken fight had occurred.  They were about to arrest them all, when the two women tried to explain how it all happened over a little green snake.  They called an ambulance, which took away the neigh or and his sobbing wife.
Just then the little snake crawled out from under the couch.  One of the policemen drew his gun and fired at it.  He missed the snake and hit the leg of the end table that was on one side of the sofa.  The table fell over and the lamp on it shattered and as the bulb broke, it wtarted a fire in the drapes.The other policeman tried to beat out the flames and fell through the window into the yard on top of the family dog, who startled, jumped up and raced out into the street, where an oncoming car swerved to avoid it and smashed into the parked police car and set it on fire.  Meanwhile, the burning drapes had spread to the walls and the entire house was blazing.
Neighbors had called the fire department and the arriving fire-truck had started raising the ladder as they were halfway down the street.  The rising ladder tore out the overhead wires and put out the electricity and disconnected the telephones in a ten-square city block area.
Time passed.  Both men were discharged from the hospital, the house was rebuilt, the police acquired a new car, and all was right with their world.
About a year later they were watching TV and the weatherman announced a cold snap for that night.  The husband asked his wife if she thought they should bring in their plants for the nigh
t.
She shot him.
 
 
 
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Hello, I am Marian Nelson Wade,
       I didn't grow up in the West End area but I guess you could say nearby, I lived in East Point and attended Russell High School class of 1960.
        I did share many of the same memories that other readers speak of, we used to go as a group to downtown Atlanta on Saturdays and enjoy justt browsing and looking in all the many fine stores there.And who could go downtown and not stop at the Planters peanut store, those roasting peanuts could be smelled all over the area.And how aboutt those delicious baked goodies from the Rich's bakery? Did any of you ever visitt the stores in the Peachtree Arcade building? They had a fountain in the center with goldfish swimming in it. We always would catch the number 20 bus to downtown and then ride the bus back home when it was almost dark outside.The bus let you off right at Rich's and we could feel safe walking all over downtown..
      Thanks to all the people who share all the memories with us.